Innis House (us1777) - Black_White_Portfolio - Bella Mondo Images

Bella Mondo Images

This frame building, known as the Innis (or “Ennis”) house, stands as a mute witness to the terrible combat that engulfed this spot. Located along the Confederate line of battle, the small structure was marred by soldier graffiti and perforated by bullets and shell fragments. Confederate General Lafayette McLaws wrote that the house “had no space as large as two hands on it that had not been pierced.” Although the family replaced the exterior clapboards, you can still see bullet marks on one of the vertical timbers on the right side of the house. More dramatic is the damage to the house’s interior. Martha Stephens, who lived next door and probably owned this building too, chose not to replace the partition wall separating the hallway from the living room. The scars made by dozens of bullets as visible today as they were in 1862.
Innis House (us1777) - Black_White_Portfolio - Bella Mondo Images
This frame building, known as the Innis (or “Ennis”) house, stands as a mute witness to the terrible combat that engulfed this spot. Located along the Confederate line of battle, the small structure was marred by soldier graffiti and perforated by bullets and shell fragments. Confederate General Lafayette McLaws wrote that the house “had no space as large as two hands on it that had not been pierced.” Although the family replaced the exterior clapboards, you can still see bullet marks on one of the vertical timbers on the right side of the house. More dramatic is the damage to the house’s interior. Martha Stephens, who lived next door and probably owned this building too, chose not to replace the partition wall separating the hallway from the living room. The scars made by dozens of bullets as visible today as they were in 1862.